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Frequently Asked Questions

Below are some of the solutions to the commonly asked questions when planning for your trip to Ghana.

Is there an additional charge for solo travellers to Ghana and West Africa?

Tour prices are quoted based on double occupancy. Solo travellers who want their own room pay the per-person price plus the single supplement fee. A single supplement is a fee imposed by hotels on individuals travelling alone who want private accommodations. We can arrange for two single travelers to share accommodations, providing they are on the same activities, of the same sex, and both persons agree to the arrangement.

What are the entry requirements for Ghana?

All non-ECOWAS citizens require visa to travel to Ghana and other West African countries. It is recommended you purchase your visa in advance. Check with Ghana consulate to verify entry requirements.

What are some of the attractions in Ghana?

Ghana tourist attractions include the following attractions: Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park, Cape Coast Castle, Elmina Castle, Mole National Park, Shai Hills Game Reserve, Ankasa National Park, Coastal Beaches, Home stays, volunteer tourism and Ecotours.

What should I pack for a trip to Ghana?

Pack as lightly as possible, but be prepared for all the activities in which you are planning to participate. Pack for the destination and season you will encounter, and be mindful that climates may vary drastically from region to region. Temperatures can also vary quite a bit between the midday heat and the evening cool, so plan to dress in layers. Comfort will be a priority, but you might consider bringing a few dressy outfits for nights out in the cities. Pack neutral-colored, comfortable, lightweight clothing. Bring sturdy walking shoes or hiking boots, depending on the anticipated level of physical activity. Wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, lip protection and good quality sunscreen are essential to protect against the harsh West African sun. Insect repellent with DEET is also a must when on a visit to Ghana and West Africa. A travel kit is recommended with any basic medications you may need, such as painkillers, antihistamines, allergy medicines or remedies for an upset stomach. If you take prescription medication, bring a sufficient supply to last for the duration of your trip, as well as the generic names so that the drugs could be replaced locally if necessary. Those who wear prescription glasses or contact lenses should bring spares.

Pack prescription medicines and spare contacts or glasses in your carry-on bag, in the event that your checked luggage is delayed. Those with digital camera or video camera battery chargers or other electrical items should bring the appropriate power converter and adapters. Securely bind all travel documents together, including tickets, passports and any visa entries, vaccination certificates and travel insurance documents.

What sort of luggage should I bring?

Due to space limitations aboard motor coaches between destinations, Hausa tours may place restrictions upon the number of bags allowed per person, and upon the maximum weight of each bag. Guests also may be required to use only soft-sided luggage or duffel bags rather than hard-sided suitcases. Ask your travel counsellor for more details.

What medical precautions should I take before travelling to Ghana and West Africa?

 It is worthwhile to protect your health and take basic precautions to ensure a smooth trip. Talk with your doctor or travel medicine specialist one to two months before your trip to discuss medical issues related to your travel destination. Travellers to Ghana and West Africa must take responsibility for obtaining required or recommended vaccinations, prescriptions, over-the-counter medications or insect repellents. Proof of vaccination may be required for entry into a destination country or for return entry into your originating country. Your doctor can advise you of the latest health precautions, as vaccination requirements are subject to change. Vaccines that may be recommended for travellers to Ghana and West Africa include those for tetanus, diphtheria, polio, typhoid, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, yellow fever, rabies and meningitis. Some of these vaccines may not become effective immediately, or may require more than one dose. If a disease was recently prevalent and is endemic in the destination country, many doctors may recommend the vaccination as a precaution.

Can I use my credit card for purchases made while in Ghana?

Most major credit cards (Visa, MasterCard and American Express) are widely accepted in the major hotels. Diners Club is not generally accepted. Most banks are equipped to advance cash on credit cards.

Is tipping a common practice in Ghana?

Tipping is not mandatory in Ghana and West Africa. Guides, drivers, waiters and hotel staff can be tipped at your discretion.

Will I have access to the Internet while in Ghana? How about international phone service?

While communications in remote villages will be limited, most major hotels offer Internet services as well as international telephone and fax services. Additionally, private communication centres and cyber cafes in larger towns enable tourists to stay connected. Some centres may close on Sundays and public holidays. The cellular networks in Ghana cover most large towns and tourist areas. There are post offices in many towns, and stamps are also sold.

What precautions should I take when dining in Ghana?

It is worthwhile to be selective when travelling through the tropics, as possible disease hazards can range from minor bouts of travellers’ diarrhoea to dysentery and more serious parasitic diseases. Food should always be thoroughly cooked and served hot. Do not feel compelled to eat anything you might be worry about, as it is better to err on the side of caution. Tour operators choose hotels and restaurants with high standards for food preparation. When dining elsewhere, it is best to avoid ice and raw produce. Avoid buying food or drink from street vendors.